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Tulsa Regional Workforce Advisory Council

The Tulsa region has a strong workforce collaborative that has grown over the past several years to better meet the needs of area businesses and job seekers. However, the region still faces a number of challenges – and opportunities – to maximize the efficiency of northeast Oklahoma’s talent pipeline.

To align existing local, regional and state workforce resources and programming, the Chamber has convened a Tulsa Regional Workforce Advisory Council.

Recommendations outlined in the 2014 Workforce Analysis Project provided strategic focus for the Chamber's Tulsa’s Future III economic development plan. This project helped create a regional plan and direction, ensuring coordination between the Chamber’s efforts and the work of community partners like Tulsa Community College, Tulsa Tech, Tulsa Public Schools, Impact Tulsa and Workforce Tulsa.

The advisory council affords additional synergy with Oklahoma Works, the umbrella organization for statewide workforce resources. Stuart Solomon, president and COO of Public Service Company of Oklahoma, both chairs the advisory council and serves as the appointed "business champion" for the Tulsa area through Oklahoma Works.

In an effort to enhance regional collaboration between education and industry, additional members of the council include leaders and executives from both. The council meets quarterly to discuss workforce pipeline strategies tied to industry needs, guided by the data and recommendations of the Workforce Analysis Project.

Relocating or expanding companies consistently rank access to skilled labor as the number one site selection factor. The Tulsa Regional Workforce Advisory Council will help implement collaborative strategies to address impediments to economic growth. By optimizing and streamlining workforce processes, the council has an opportunity to make substantial impacts on the development of local talent.

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